Resource Guide

Title: Addressing Alcohol’s Role in Campus Sexual Assault: A Toolkit by and for Prevention Specialists
Type of Resource: Toolkit
Source: Prevention Innovations Research Center and Campus Advocacy & Prevention Professionals Association
Keywords:
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Mental and Emotional Health
Prevention Planning
Response Strategies
URL Link: https://cola.unh.edu/sites/cola.unh.edu/files/media/SAAlcToolkit.pdf
Brief Summary: Alcohol use plays a role in 50 to 70% of campus sexual assaults, which has generated heightened consideration of the intersection of sexual assault and alcohol on campus. This toolkit integrates research and practice evidence to help prevention specialists begin to answer the question: How should our campus address alcohol in our sexual assault prevention efforts?
Main Points

  • This toolkit was developed through a participatory action research project, and addresses the following topics regarding alcohol and sexual assault:
    • An overview of alcohol’s role in campus sexual assault across the social ecology (Individual, relationship, community, and society & policy levels)
    • How to cultivate campus-specific, trauma-informed messaging on alcohol’s role in campus sexual assault
    • How to identify stakeholders and key partners in this effort
    • Common challenges and how to answer difficult questions
    • Advice from the field:
      • Establish a clear mission for your program overall, and specifically for addressing alcohol’s role in campus sexual assault
      • Build strong relationships with faculty, staff, and student partners
      • Inventory existing campus messages to identify gaps and inconsistencies
      • Identify and seek to challenge social norms

Title: Addressing Sexual and Relationship Violence on College and University Campuses
Type of Resource: Report
Source: The American College Health Association, 2016
Keywords:
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Prevention Planning
Response Strategies
White House Task Force Recommendations
URL Link: https://www.acha.org/documents/resources/guidelines/Addressing_Sexual_Violence.pdf
Brief Summary: This article summarizes the ACHA’s Healthy Campus 2020 health objectives that serve as a basis for developing plans and programs to reduce sexual and relationship violence, as well as injury prevention. These recommendations serve only as a guide to building a comprehensive program and are not meant to provide recommendations on how each campus should manage respondents and conduct issues following a reported incident.
Main Points

  • The article uses a public health framework to address the topics of sexual and relationship violence, and suggests an ecological approach to improve student, faculty, and staff health.
  • The article includes suggestions for developing and integrating services for prevention, risk reduction, and response of sexual and relationship violence, including:
    • Prevention – prioritize resources, coordinate prevention-related messaging throughout campus, make sure communications are ongoing, multi-dose, and comprehensive
    • Risk Reduction – place blame on perpetrator (not victim), present risk reduction programs in addition to primary prevention, focus on empowerment instead of fear
    • Response – provide trauma-informed training throughout campus, provide advocacy services and 24/7 crisis lines, coordinate response through team effort across campus
  • The article also includes additional recommendations and directions for the future, including developing a policy statement, conducting climate surveys on a regular basis, and implementing ongoing trainings for students, staff and faculty on campus

Title: An Examination of Campus Climate for LGBTQ Community College Students
Type of Resource: Scholarly Journal Article
Source: Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 2015
Keywords:
Climate Surveys
Community Colleges
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Mental & Emotional Health
Non-Traditional Students
URL Link: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1052723
Brief Summary: This study found that first-generation LGBTQ students experience a more hostile campus climate at community colleges, which is particularly manifested through classroom experiences and faculty interactions.
Main Points

  • Methods: Data for this study originates from Rankin, Blumenfeld, Weber, and Frazer’s (2010) State of Higher Education for LGBT People. Participants included college students from all 50 states, including 102 community college students.
  • Results: Classroom climate was the strongest predictor of students’ overall campus climate. Results from quantitative data suggest community colleges have campus climates that are not supportive of LGBTQ students.
  • Conclusions: This study found what students experience within the classroom and among faculty largely predicts their attitude and perceptions of campus climate. Researchers offer recommendations for potential best practices for working with LGBTQ community college students.

Title: Assessing the Need and Receptivity for an Integrated Healthy Sexual and Dating Relationships Intervention for Community College Students
Type of Resource: Scholarly Journal Article
Source: Journal of Applied Research on Children: Informing Policy for Children at Risk, 2017
Keywords:
Community Colleges
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Mental & Emotional Health
Non-Traditional Students
Prevention Planning
URL Link:
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/childrenatrisk/vol8/iss1/1/
Brief Summary: The authors emphasize the need for an integrated responsible sexual behavior and dating violence prevention program on community college campuses.  The article presents findings from research to assess the need and receptivity for a web-based intervention targeted at community college students.
Main Points

  • Methods: Three community colleges participated in a pilot study that comprised an online survey of students’ behavior related to sexual and dating relationships. The study also tested the usability of a web-based healthy sexual and dating relationship intervention, which included interactive quizzes, skills training, modeling and a peer video to address psychosocial factors related to sexual health and relationship violence.
  • Results: Overall, two-thirds of participants (66%) reported having been the victim of any type of dating violence in the past year, including psychological violence (56%), physical violence (25%), threatening (28%), sexual violence (30%), or cyber (28%) dating violence victimization. Additionally, two-thirds of participants (66%) reported perpetrating any of the above types of dating violence in the past year. Females compared to males were more likely to report victimization (70% vs 56%) and perpetration (71% vs 54%) of dating violence. Additionally, the web-based sexual risk reduction and healthy relationship activities were rated by participants as likable, easy to use, acceptably paced, credible, and helpful for making healthy choices.
  • Conclusion: This study assessed the need and receptivity for an integrated healthy sexual and dating relationships intervention among community college students. Quantitative data from the online survey revealed high rates of sexual risk behavior, indicating the need to increase education and prevention at community colleges.

Title: Bringing in the Bystander® In-Person Prevention Program
Type of Resource: Curriculum
Source: Prevention Innovations Research Center, 2018
Keywords:
Bystander Intervention
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Prevention Planning
White House Task Force Recommendations
URL Link: http://cola.unh.edu/prevention-innovations/bystander
Brief Summary: This prevention program emphasizes a bystander intervention approach and assumes everyone has a role to play in ending violence against women. The program uses a community of responsibility model to teach bystanders how to intervene safely and effectively in cases where sexual assault may
Main Points

  • Peer facilitators provide an active learning environment for participants to learn about the role of bystanders in communities, information about sexual violence, and how to practice appropriate and safe prevention skills.
    • The program consists of:
      • Introduction to bystander responsibility
      • Use of local community examples
      • Active learning exercises to raise awareness of the continuum of sexual violence, its causes and impact on victims
      • Discussion and practice of a range of active, potentially helpful bystander behaviors as well as the costs and benefits of different behaviors
      • Discussion of importance of personal safety and presentation of community resources
      • Bystander pledge to increase commitment to intervene
      • ABC Card: Includes reminders of the decision-making process for intervening, lists several examples of ways to intervene and provides contact information for relevant resources

Evaluation: This program has been evaluated with both a short one-session curriculum and a longer multi-session version on the campus of the University of New Hampshire. Evaluation is ongoing and results demonstrate the efficacy of this program for increasing participants’ knowledge, attitudes and behaviors about effective responses to sexual violence.
Link to evaluation information: http://cola.unh.edu/prevention-innovations-research-center/peer-reviewed-publications

Title: Challenges in Preventing and Responding to Sexual Violence at American Community Colleges
Type of Resource: Report
Source: National Center for Campus Public Safety, 2016
Keywords:
Community Colleges
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Prevention Planning
Response Strategies
URL Link: http://www.nccpsafety.org/resources/library/challenges-in-preventing-and-responding-to-sexual-violence-at-american-comm/
Brief Summary: Community colleges face unique challenges regarding sexual assault prevention and response compared to traditional institutions of higher education (IHE). During a forum in April 2016, NCCPS and AAWCC came together to identify the areas of critical need regarding prevention and response to sexual violence, as well as to develop recommendations for community colleges to help with these challenges.
Main Points

  • Forum participants identified the four main categories of challenges community colleges face when preventing and responding to sexual violence:
    • Nonstandard physical security: Open access campuses or multiple campuses, with many buildings to oversee
    • Cumbersome compliance: Sexual violence legislation is often developed with traditional IHEs in mind, causing community colleges to work around regulations designed for significantly different types of school.
    • Cultural barriers: Community colleges often have dramatically different student demographics than traditional IHEs, therefore requiring different prevention and response strategies
    • Lack of resources, education, training, and support services: Community colleges often lack the funds to make sexual violence prevention a priority. They are also less likely to have compliance officers, legal counsel, health educators, or student affairs personnel.
  • The report outlines recommendations for each category to improve sexual violence prevention and response.  These recommendations include evaluating facilities, creating policy repositories, organizing student forums, adopting a common logo, and investing more in employee training.

Title: Choosing Prevention Projects: Questions to Ask When Considering Sexual and Relationship Violence and Stalking Prevention Products
Type of Resource: White Paper
Source: Prevention Innovations Research Center, 2016
Keywords:
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Prevention Planning
URL Link: http://cola.unh.edu/prevention-innovations-research-center/white-papers-and-other-pirc-reports
Brief Summary: This white paper offers guidance to colleges and universities on how to assess products advertised as effective in preventing campus sexual interpersonal violence.  The document provides questions that college leaders can ask as they consider different prevention products and assess whether they will effectively meet the needs of their campus communities.
Main Points

The white paper outlines several types of questions to ask when determining what prevention program is best for your campus, including questions about:

  • Effectiveness
  • Evaluation, data collection, and data protection
  • Development and Content
  • Relevance to community

Title: The Clery Act on Campus: Status Update and Gender Implications
Type of Resource: Scholarly Journal Article
Source: New Directions for Community Colleges, 2017
Keywords:
Campus Safety & Policy
Clery Act, Title IX & Other Federal Guidance
Community Colleges
Response Strategies
URL Link:
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/cc.20262
Brief Summary:  The Clery Act is “imperfect but important.” This article critiques the updates to the Clery Act for community colleges, and takes a closer look at the gender implications with regards to the current updates in accordance with administrative collaboration.
Main Points

  • The author argues that we must change campus community environment in order to encourage more college students to report crimes. Higher crime reporting numbers may reflect heightened awareness of crimes that had previously gone unreported.
  • A team approach to enforce the Clery Act is essential. Community colleges have an even greater need to collaborate with more resourced colleges and universities in order to ensure campus safety is a priority.
  • Cooperation among college offices is necessary to ensure proper implementation of the Clery Act. All members of the campus community must come together to share information regarding crime on and off campus. Campus administrators, faculty, and students also need to fully understand the literature surrounding victimization and gender distinctions.

Title: Coaching Boys Into Men
Type of Resource: Curriculum
Source: Futures Without Violence, 2017
Keywords:
Bystander Intervention
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Prevention Planning
URL Link: https://www.futureswithoutviolence.org/engaging-men/coaching-boys-into-men/
Brief Summary: The Coaching Boys into Men (CBIM) program provides high school athletic coaches with the resources they need to promote respectful behavior among their players and help prevent relationship abuse, harassment, and sexual assault.
Main Points

The CBIM curriculum consists of a series of coach-to-athlete trainings that illustrate ways to model respect and promote healthy relationships. The program instructs coaches on how to incorporate themes associated with teamwork, integrity, fair play, and respect into their daily practice and routine.

  • The CBIM toolkit contains:
    • The CBIM Playbook: includes facts and information about building healthy relationships and a stronger team; teachable moment scenarios; tips and tactics on how to talk to your athletes
    • The CBIM Card Series: weekly discussions with your athletes throughout the season
    • Information on how to prepare for teachable moments

Evaluation: Miller et al. (2013) evaluated the implementation of Coaching Boys Into Men in 16 high schools. Results suggested perpetration of dating violence in the last 3 months was less prevalent among intervention athletes relative to control athletes. Intervention athletes also reported lower levels of negative bystander behaviors compared to controls. Effects on sexual violence were not assessed.  Researchers concluded the program is a promising approach to reduce perpetration and negative bystander behaviors that condone dating violence among male athletes.
Link to evaluation information: https://www.safetylit.org/citations/index.php?fuseaction=citations.viewdetails&citationIds%5b%5d=citjournalarticle_406116_33

Title: Communicating and Using Climate Survey Results
Type of Resource: White Paper
Source: Prevention Innovations Research Center, 2015
Keywords:
Climate Studies
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
URL Link: http://cola.unh.edu/prevention-innovations-research-center/white-papers-and-other-pirc-reports
Brief Summary: This white paper outlines the use of college climate surveys to inform campus policy decisions and practices they use to respond to and prevent dating and domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking.  The document provides questions to ask and suggested strategies to use to develop a thoughtful strategy about how to present findings from the survey.
Main Points

Example questions for climate study committees to ask when preparing to discuss climate study results, include:

  • Who has ownership of the data?
  • Who will write and speak about the results?
  • What will your community use the data for?

Title: Community Colleges and Sexual Misconduct: Unique Challenges and Opportunities
Type of Resource: Report
Source: Association for Student Conduct Administration, 2015
Keywords:
Campus Safety & Policy
Clery Act, Title IX, and Other Federal Guidance
Community Colleges
URL Link: www.theasca.org/Files/2015%20Community%20Colleges%20%26%20Title%20IX.pdf
Brief Summary: The report discusses the many unique challenges community colleges face when attempting to end sexual assault on campus, including how prevention and response efforts can be used at institutions without residence halls.  The report also discusses the importance of college completion and merging this issue with sexual assault, as students who have been sexually harassed or assaulted during their college career are more likely to drop out of school.
Main Points

The ASCA outlines the several unique challenges community colleges face in ending sexual violence on campus, including open access and enrollment, diversity of the student body, lack of access to all students, and limited resources.  The report also offers suggestions and recommendations for helping prevent sexual assault and increase college completion, including collaborating with community partners, Title IX compliance as a measure of accreditation, engage in risk assessment, and focus on rehabilitation for sexual violence perpetrators.

Title: Community Colleges: Opportunities for Sexual and Domestic Violence Prevention
Type of Resource: Webinar
Source: PreventConnect, 2016
Keywords:
Clery Act, Title IX & Other Federal Guidance
Community Colleges
Prevention Planning
URL Link: http://www.preventconnect.org/2016/06/community-colleges-opportunities-for-prevention/
Brief Summary: This webinar seeks to provide an overview of the common challenges community colleges face when working to prevent sexual and domestic violence, as well as opportunities for improvement and examples of successful prevention work at community colleges currently.
Main Points

  • Community colleges have unique landscapes: non-traditional students, open access admissions and campus, diverse and disparate student needs
  • Challenges for community colleges: high-risk populations, lack of mandatory orientation, rolling admission and various entry points, conveying message that Title IX cases that happen off campus must also be investigated
  • Opportunities for community colleges: strong community partnerships, focus on grant development and innovative programming, diversity of students, faculty & staff, civic engagement (with examples in webinar)

Title: Comprehensive Prevention on College Campuses
Type of Resource: Webinar
Source: PreventConnect, 2016
Keywords:
Clery Act, Title IX & Other Federal Guidance
Prevention Planning
URL Link: http://www.preventconnect.org/2016/01/preventconnect-campus-comprehensive-prevention-on-college-campuses/
Brief Summary: This webinar seeks to demonstrate how campuses can maintain consistent and intentional prevention across a variety of programs and initiatives.  Guests from a campus-based program and a community-campus partnership explore components of their comprehensive interpersonal violence prevention strategies.  They identify components of comprehensive prevention strategies on college campuses, and also suggest next steps to strengthen the comprehensiveness of campus prevention work.
Main Points

  • 3-Pronged Approach to Effectively Addressing and Preventing Sexual, Domestic, Dating and Stalking Violence on College Campuses:
    • Trauma-Informed
    • Community Collaboration and Engagement
    • Comprehensive Prevention
  • Prevention must be strategic, intentional, and comprehensive (primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention)
  • Collaborative work is crucial, because violence is not an isolated issue – work towards a goal of consistent messaging and community saturation

Title: Ending Campus Sexual Assault Toolkit
Type of Resource: Toolkit
Source: American Association of University Women (AAUW), 2016
Keywords:
Clery Act, Title IX & Other Federal Guidance
Prevention Planning
Students & Student Activism
URL Link: http://www.aauw.org/resource/campus-sexual-assault-tool-kit/
Brief Summary: The AAUW offers a toolkit of resources to raise awareness about campus sexual assault and serves the needs of faculty, staff, students, and advocates. The toolkit includes ideas for programming, frequently asked questions, funding opportunities, and information on how to take action on campus.
Main Points

The AAUW Toolkit includes:

  • Take Action: 10 Ways to Fight Sexual Assault
  • 6 Ways Faculty and Staff Can Fight Sexual Violence on Campus
  • Take the Pledge to Deliver New Title IX Resources to Your Local Schools
  • Here’s Your Talking-Points Memo on Campus Sexual Assault
  • 5 Funding Sources for Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Initiatives

Title: Engaging Men: Triumphs, Troubles, and Tools
Type of Resource: Webinar
Source: National Resource Center on Domestic Violence, 2015
Keywords:
Bystander Intervention
Prevention Planning
Students & Student Activism
URL Link: http://vawnet.org/material/engaging-men-triumphs-troubles-and-tools
Brief Summary: The webinar was designed to generate dialogue about engaging men to prevent violence against women, and to explore the benefits of men’s expanding involvement, the impact of this shift on community-based work, and the unintended consequences of men’s leadership.
Main Points

As men’s involvement in anti-violence work grows and as more men emerge as leaders, the issue of male power and privilege becomes even more salient.  Webinar focuses on how to implement effective accountability practices is even more critical.  Recommendations include:

  • Require newcomers to receive training and education before stepping into leadership roles
  • Men’s organizations and groups should be connected to women’s organizations and groups
  • Re-conceptualize accountability to include an emphasis on building equity within the movement

Title: Green Dot
Type of Resource: Curriculum
Source: Alteristic, 2018
Keywords:
Bystander Intervention
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Prevention Planning
URL Link: https://alteristic.org/services/green-dot/
Brief Summary: Green Dot seeks to empower potential bystanders to actively engage their peers. The program’s approach is built on the premise that violence can be measurably and systematically reduced within a community.
Main Points

The Green Dot curriculum is typically contains two components: 50-minute motivational speeches targeting first-year students in introductory-level courses throughout the academic year, and Intensive Bystander Training delivered to a select group of student leaders.  Interactive skill-development training is conducted in small groups and lasts 4-6 hours.

Evaluation: Coker et al. (2016) evaluated the implementation of Green Dot on a college campus by comparing three similarly sized public university campuses. Findings indicate Green Dot is associated with lower rates of IP violence over time at the campus level. This suggests Green Dot is a promising strategy for the prevention of sexual and other forms of violence victimization and perpetration among students.
Link to evaluation information: http://www.ajpmonline.org/article/S0749-3797(15)00553-X/pdf

Title: Intimate Partner Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health Need Among Female Community College Students
Type of Resource: Scholarly Journal Article
Source: Journal of American College Health, 2018
Keywords:
Community Colleges
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Mental & Emotional Health
Non-Traditional Students
URL Link: https://doi.org/10.1080/07448481.2018.1456443
Brief Summary: This article looks at the impacts of interpersonal violence on female community college students, including intimate partner violence, trauma exposure, sexual violence victimizations, and associated mental health consequences. The study provides evidence that community college students are experiencing violence and the accompanying mental health impacts at high rates.
Main Points

  • Methods: A web-based quantitative survey of female community college students was administered to 435 participants in a large Midwestern Metropolitan area. Participants were asked about intimate partner violence, sexual violence and lifetime interpersonal trauma exposure, and post-traumatic stress disorder.
  • Results: Results show that over 27% of women met the threshold for having experiences intimate partner violence over the last 12 months. Results also find that the majority of respondents (56.60%) have experienced at least one of the three listed traumas in their lifetime. Lastly, results show that 19% of respondents met the established clinical cutoffs for current PTSD.
  • Conclusion: Intimate partner violence, sexual assault, and the accompanying mental health consequences are extremely prevalent among female community college students. Trauma treatment mechanisms could significantly decrease intimate partner violence, help survivors deal with the consequences of abuse, and decrease the risk of re-victimization.

Title: It’s Not Just the What but the How: Informing Students About Policies and Resources
Type of Resource: White Paper
Source: Prevention Innovations Research Center, 2015
Keywords:
Campus Safety & Policy
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
White House Task Force Recommendations 
URL Link: http://cola.unh.edu/prevention-innovations-research-center/white-papers-and-other-pirc-reports
Brief Summary: This white paper was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault by Prevention Innovations Research Center at the University of New Hampshire to report the findings of their study on the efficacy of different methods to deliver campus sexual misconduct policy information to first year students.
Main Points

  • Researchers at seven universities across the U.S. collaborated on project to examine the delivery of campus sexual misconduct policies to first year students
  • Participants were randomized into four interventions and a control group. Pretest and posttest outcomes were compared to assess knowledge and help seeking related to sexual assault.
  • Findings show that all of the groups had some variables on which scores improved over time, but the largest change in scores was seen for groups that received the information presented in two or more ways (e.g., Group 4 participants who were read the policy in class and immediately participated in a facilitated discussion).
  • Results suggest that first-year students need time to process and practice skills that will increase their knowledge about sexual misconduct policies and their confidence to act in pro-social ways.

Title: It’s On Us: Campaign Organizing Toolkit
Type of Resource: Toolkit
Source: It’s On Us, 2015
Keywords:
Campaigns, Communications & Marketing
Students & Student Activism
White House Task Force Recommendations
URL Link: http://www.aplu.org/members/councils/governmental-affairs/CGA-library/its-on-us-toolkit/file
Brief Summary: “It’s On Us” is an education-based campaign focusing on sexual assault awareness and prevention on college campuses, encouraging individuals to take the pledge to help be a part of the solution to end sexual assault.  The organizing toolkit gives strategies and materials to help students and university personnel create a call to action on their own campus.
Main Points

The “It’s On Us” Organizing Toolkit includes:

  • Tips for starting the conversation and organizing an event on campus
  • Social media and digital organizing strategies
  • Campaign tools and example materials

Title: Know Your IX Campus Organizing Toolkit
Type of Resource: Toolkit
Source: Know Your IX, 2015
Keywords:
Bystander Intervention
Campaigns, Communications & Marketing
Clery Act, Title IX & Other Federal Guidelines
Prevention Planning
Students & Student Activism
URL Link: https://www.knowyourix.org/campus-action/campus-organizing-toolkit/
Brief Summary: Know Your IX is a national survivor-led, youth powered organization educating students about their right to an education free from sexual violence.  This toolkit includes tips, policy recommendations, and emerging strategies for student organizers based on our experiences on the ground.
Main Points

The toolkit is divided into four parts, including:

  • Opening – values statement, letters to survivors and allies, about Know Your IX
  • Understanding the Issue – knowing the law, best practices
  • Taking Action – building a team, how to plan a campaign, how to work the media
  • What Next? – reading list, resources, sample materials

Title: Long-term Impacts of College Sexual Assaults on Women Survivors’ Educational and Career Attainments
Type of Resource: Scholarly Journal Article
Source: Journal of American College Health, 2018
Keywords:
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Mental & Emotional Health
URL Link: https://doi.org/10.1080/07448481.2018.1440574
Brief Summary: This article examines how trauma impacts college sexual assault survivors’ human capital, particularly education trajectory and career attainment. The study also demonstrates the significant public health cost attributed to sexual assault, as survivors often miss time from school and work, drop out of college, and experience negative long-term mental and physical health symptoms from the assault.
Main Points

  • Methods: Researchers developed and piloted an online survey for female college sexual assault survivors. Eighty-one individuals completed the survey, and 32 of these women completed an in-depth qualitative phone interview about their experience.
  • Results: Participants described an inability to resume their typical role as a student following the assault. For instance, some participants reported leaving/transferring school or dropping out completely. As a result, participants stated their career goals were derailed. Some participants directly attributed their assault to underemployment, not using their degrees, and/or feeling their positions were not the best use of their skills. Lastly, 91% of participants reported health problems related to the assault that they directly attributed to difficulties they faced in their attainment of their education and career goals.
  • Conclusion: This study emphasizes the importance of education, career training and health on human capital. It finds that human capital opportunities can be lost or undermined in the long-term as a result of sexual assault/trauma.

Title: Know Your Power® Bystander Social Marketing Campaign
Type of Resource: Curriculum
Source: Prevention Innovations Research Center, 2018
Keywords:
Bystander Intervention
Campaigns, Communications & Marketing
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Prevention Planning
URL Link: http://cola.unh.edu/prevention-innovations-research-center/know-your-power%C2%AE-bystander-social-marketing-campaign
Brief Summary: The Know Your Power® Bystander Social Marketing Campaign is a nationally recognized program focused on reducing sexual and relationship violence and stalking on college campuses. The campaign consists of a series of images which portray realistic and thought-provoking scenarios that highlight the important role all members of the community have in ending sexual assault, relationship violence, and stalking. The Campaign can be used on its own or in combination with the Bringing in the Bystander® In-Person Prevention Program.
Main Points

The program seeks to:

  • Increase target audience members’ knowledge of how to safely intervene in cases of sexual and relationship violence
  • Increase their willingness to get involved in reducing violence
  • Increase the likelihood that they have acted as an active bystander in a situation where sexual and relationship violence is about to occur, is occurring or has occurred.

Evaluation: This program has been evaluated with both a short one-session curriculum and a longer multi-session version on the campus of the University of New Hampshire. Evaluation is ongoing and results demonstrate the efficacy of this program for increasing participants’ knowledge, attitudes and behaviors about effective responses to sexual violence.
Link to evaluation information: http://cola.unh.edu/prevention-innovations-research-center/peer-reviewed-publications

Title: The Mental Health Status of Single-Parent Community College Students in California
Type of Resource: Scholarly Journal Article
Source: Journal of American College Health, 2016
Keywords:
Community Colleges
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Mental & Emotional Health
Non-Traditional Students
URL Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26151464
Brief Summary: Single parent students face unique challenges that can adversely affect their mental health. Researchers examined a community college population to examine the association between single parenting and negative mental health. Their findings show that single parents face a higher prevalence of mental health stressors than other community college students.
Main Points

  • Methods: Authors conducted a secondary analysis of Spring 2013 data from the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment to examine difficulties facing single-parent community college students. Participants were 6,832 California community college students, of whom 309 were single parents.
  • Results: Finances, family, and relationship difficulties disproportionately affected single parents, who reported nearly twice as many suicide attempts as their counterparts. However, single parenting students were also more likely to seek help from professionals when faced with adverse life circumstances.
  • Conclusions: Single-parenting students face a higher prevalence of mental health stressors than other community college students. College administrators must work to support single parents so they can improve their health and achieve their education.

Title: NO MORE Toolkit
Type of Resource: Toolkit
Source: NO MORE, 2016
Keywords:
Campaigns, Communications & Marketing
Prevention Planning
Students & Student Activism
URL Link: http://cola.unh.edu/prevention-innovations-research-center/white-papers-and-other-pirc-reports
Brief Summary: The NO MORE campaign aims to raise public awareness and engagement around ending domestic and sexual violence.  The toolkit offers resources and guidelines to assist in co-branding public education and awareness events with the NO MORE message.
Main Points

Inside the toolkit you will find:

  • Usage Guidelines and Description
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • NO MORE Logos, fliers, postcards, posters, and email templates
  • Sample social media posts
  • Awareness Event Toolkit
  • Action Guide Palm Card

Title: Not Alone: First Report of the White House Task Force to Protect Students From Sexual Assault
Type of Resource: Report
Source: The White House Task Force to Protect Students From Sexual Assault, 2014
Keywords:
Campus Safety & Policy
Clery Act, Title IX, & Other Federal Guidance
Climate Surveys
White House Task Force Recommendations
URL Link: http://www.changingourcampus.org/resources/not-alone/WH_Task_Force_First_Report.pdf
Brief Summary: This report was created by the Obama Administration’s Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault to provide action steps and recommendations towards addressing sexual assault on college and university campuses.
Main Points

In this report you will find:

  • An Executive Summary
  • Introduction
  • Our First Task: Listening
  • How Best to Identify the Problem: Campus Climate Surveys
  • Preventing Sexual Assault on Campus
  • Responding Effectively When a Student is Sexually Assaulted
  • Improving the Federal Government’s Enforcement Efforts, and Making Them More Transparent
  • Next Steps

Title: Prevalence and Effects of Life Event Exposure Among Undergraduate and Community College Students
Type of Resource: Scholarly Journal Article
Source: Journal of Counseling Psychiatry, 2012
Keywords:
Community Colleges 
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Mental & Emotional Health
Non-Traditional Students
URL Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22563668
Brief Summary: This study assessed the connection between lifetime and recent exposure to a range of potentially traumatic events and a broad range of outcomes (mental and physical health, life satisfaction, grade point average) among undergraduate and community college students.
Main Points

  • Methods: Undergraduate students from a Midwestern university and a community college completed online measures of lifetime event exposure at outcomes at Time 1 and recent event exposure two months later. Life events included events that did and did not meet the definition of a traumatic event in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.
  • Results: Generally, individuals who reported more lifetime events also reported poorer outcomes, including greater PTSD symptom severity, more general distress, lower life satisfaction, poor health, and lower GPAs. Community college students reported more events than did lifetime students. The number of non-Criterion A1 and directly experienced events tended to be more strongly correlated with negative outcomes.
  • Conclusions: These findings suggest that non-A1 events are important to assess and can significantly be related to negative outcomes for undergraduate and community college students. Results also indicate that community college students in particular are in need of outreach regarding exposure to stressful events and potentially traumatic events.

Title: Prevalence of Probable Mental Disorders and Help Seeking Behaviors among Veteran and Non-veteran Community College Students
Type of Resource: Scholarly Journal Article
Source: General Hospital Psychiatry, 2016
Keywords:
Community Colleges 
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Mental & Emotional Health
Non-Traditional Students
URL Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26598288
Brief Summary:This study found high rates of mental illness among veteran and non-veteran community college students, which can have negative consequences for academic achievement, employment, substance misuse, and social relationships.
Main Points

  • Methods: Veteran and non-veteran students were recruited from 11 community colleges and administered screeners for depression, generalized anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, non-lethal self-injury, suicide ideation and suicide intent. The survey also asked about perceived need for and barriers to utilization of mental health services.
  • Results: A large proportion of student veterans and non-veterans screened positive for mental illness. Student veterans had a significantly higher prevalence of positive depression screens, positive PTSD screens, and suicide ideation. Student veterans also had a significantly higher chance of perceiving a need for treatment compared to non-veterans, but were more likely to perceive stigma.
  • Conclusions: The results of this study highlight the need to connect community college students to effective mental health services.

Title: Preventing and Addressing Campus Sexual Misconduct: A Guide for University and College Presidents, Chancellors, and Senior Administrators
Type of Resource: Report
Source: The White House Task Force to Protect Students From Sexual Assault, 2017
Keywords:
Campus Safety & Policy
Clery Act, Title IX, & Other Federal Guidance
Prevention Planning
Response Strategies
White House Task Force Recommendations
URL Link: https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/whitehouse.gov/files/images/Documents/1.4
.17.VAW%20Event.Guide%20for%20College%20Presidents.PDF
Brief Summary: This report is a follow up to the Obama Administration’s 2014 “Not Alone” report, and focuses on six primary elements that colleges and universities may want to consider as part of a comprehensive plan for addressing sexual misconduct against students.
Main Points

This guide expands on the following elements:

  • Coordinated Campus and Community Response
  • Prevention and Education
  • Policy Development and Implementation
  • Reporting Options, Advocacy and Support Services
  • Climate Surveys, Performance Measurement, and Evaluation
  • Transparency

Title: Preventing Sexual Violence on Campus
Type of Resource: Toolkit
Source: National Sexual Violence Resource Center, 2015
Keywords:
Campaigns, Communications & Marketing
Prevention Planning
Students & Student Activism
URL Link: http://www.nsvrc.org/saam/preventing-sexual-violence-campus
Brief Summary: This toolkit is designed to provide resources on campus sexual violence prevention to help create safe college campuses and communities.  The materials can be used by advocates, campus personnel, and students to take action to end sexual assault.
Main Points

The toolkit includes:

  • Resources for Preventing Sexual Violence on Campus – campaign brochure, overview on campus sexual violence prevention, action steps for healthcare professionals, faculty and staff, and campus administrators
  • Planning Tools – how to create a campaign, event planning guide, proclamations, prevention tips
  • Graphics – posters from the 2015 SAAM campaign
  • Media Activism – social media toolkit, sample letter to the editor, media packet

Title: School Sabotage as a Form of Intimate Partner Violence: Provider Perspectives
Type of Resource: Scholarly Journal Article
Source: Affilia: Journal of Women and Social Work, 2017
Keywords:
Community Colleges
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Mental & Emotional Health
Non-Traditional Students
Response Strategies
URL Link: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0886109916689785
Brief Summary: This study examined school sabotage as a form of economic abuse among community college students. Their findings emphasize the importance for faculty, staff, and IPV service providers on community college campuses to recognize school as a place where coercive control can be exercised, even if the abusive partner does not attend school.
Main Points

  • Methods: Researchers conducted semi-structured interviews with social service providers who work with community college students. The qualitative data was coded for themes using content (occurrence of specific ideas) and relational (relationships between ideas) analysis.
  • Results: School sabotage was found to be a real problem with negative impacts on the lives of students. Four primary themes emerged from the data, including:
    1) Abusive partners use a variety of controlling and coercive tactics to sabotage their partner’s educational pursuits, disrupt financial aid, or stalk their partner at school, among other tactics
    2) Survivors experience serious consequences, including emotional and academic impacts
    3) Abusers display a range of emotions including jealousy, resentment, and insecurity
    4) Many survivors are determined to use education as a pathway to safety and opportunity
  • Conclusions: Through service provider interviews, the researchers found that community college students face many school sabotage tactics. Faculty, staff, and IPV service providers on community college campuses need to recognize school as a place where coercive control can be exercised, even if the abusive partner does not attend school.

Title: Sexual Assault Prevention: A Guide for Students, Educators and School Administrators
Type of Resource: Toolkit
Source: tobecomeateacher.org, 2015
Keywords:
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Prevention Planning
Response Strategies
Students & Student Activism
White House Task Force Recommendations 
URL Link: http://tobecomeateacher.org/resources/sexual-assault-prevention-guide/
Brief Summary: This compilations of resources contains information on what can be done to prevent sexual assault on campus and what specific roles students, educators, administrators, and parents can play in sexual assault prevention.
Main Points

The webpage contains information on:

  • Widespread issue of sexual assault among the student-age population
  • How educators and school administrators prevent sexual assault
  • Proactive steps for students
  • What to do if you experience unwanted sexual contact of any kind
  • What parents can do to ensure their kids are safe on campus
  • What men can do to help prevent campus sexual violence
  • Additional resources

Title: Sexual Assault Prevention on U.S. College Campuses: A National Scan
Type of Resource: Report
Source: PreventConnect, 2016
Keywords:
Bystander Intervention
Clery Act, Title IX & Other Federal Regulations
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Prevention Planning
White House Task Force Recommendations
URL Link: http://www.preventconnect.org/2016/05/sexual-assault-prevention-on-u-s-college-campuses-a-national-scan/
Brief Summary: This report is an analysis of hundreds of college campuses as part of an environmental scan of sexual violence prevention across the United States. The report outlines the theories, challenges, and opportunities of several components of sexual violence prevention programs, with examples of successful programs from different colleges and universities.
Main Points

The report covers a wide range of topics, including:

  • The Evolving Landscape of Sexual Violence Prevention on U.S. College Campuses
  • Mandates and Regulations
  • Challenges and Opportunities in Sexual Violence Prevention
  • Analyzing Widely Used Prevention Approaches
  • Questions, Considerations, and Next Steps

Title: Sexual Violence on Campus: Strategies for Prevention
Type of Resource: Report
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 2016
Keywords:
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Prevention Planning
White House Task Force Recommendations
URL Link: https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/campussv-prevention.pdf
Brief Summary: In 2015, the CDC was tasked by the White House to gather a panel of experts to discuss practices to prevent sexual violence on U.S. Colleges and university campuses. Together, these leading experts in the field created a framework for sexual violence prevention efforts.  The report also includes a list of potential prevention partners, sample action plan, and resources to get started.
Main Points

The CDC’s approach to campus sexual violence prevention efforts is a framework that contains five components, including:

  • Comprehensive prevention – strategies that complement and reinforce each other
  • Infrastructure – the organizations system must be effective for the type of institution
  • Audience – campaign messages and strategies must represent and appeal to target audience
  • Partnerships and Sustainability – development of working relationships with community stakeholders in order to be sustainable over time
  • Evaluation – must be able to define what is working and what is not working with the programs, policies, or practices

The report gives detailed examples of each of the five components, as well as examples of effective prevention programs at colleges and universities across the country, and guidance on how to start a program at your own institution.

Evaluation: This report includes evidence-based strategies for prevention found in the CDC’s STOP SV Technical Package. These approaches may not have efficacy evidence in a campus context, but many approaches can be tailored for the setting and still be promising for sexual violence outcomes.
For more evaluation information, see Evaluation Prevention Efforts (page 13)

Title: Stop SV: A Technical Package to Prevent Sexual Violence
Type of Resource: Report
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 2016
Keywords:
Bystander Intervention
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Prevention Planning
URL Link: https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/sv-prevention-technical-package.pdf
Brief Summary: This technical package by the CDC outlines research on the prevalence of sexual violence, as well as the importance of increasing evidence-based research prevention strategies.  The strategies and approaches found in this technical package represent CDC’s understanding of the best ways to prevent sexual violence based on the current state of the evidence.
Main Points

The CDC uses the acronym “STOP SV” to represent strategies and approaches to preventing sexual violence:

S – Promote social norms that protect against violence through bystander approaches, such as mobilizing men as allies
T – Teach skills to prevent sexual violence, such as social emotional learning, empowerment-based training, and promoting healthy relationships and sexuality
O – Provide opportunities to empower and support girls and women
P – Create protective environments by improving safety in schools,
SV – Support victims to lessen harms, including treatment for at-risk children and families to prevent problem behavior including sex offending

Evaluation: The technical package emphasizes the importance of evaluation as a necessary component to a public health approach to prevention, as planning, implementation, and assessment all rely on accurate measurement of the problem.  The package includes an appendix that charts programs with the best evidence of prevention against sexual violence.
For more evaluation information see: Appendix: Summary of Strategies and Approaches to Stop SV (Page 42-43)

Title: Student Action Packet on Campus Climate Surveys
Type of Resource: Toolkit
Source: Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), U.S. Department of Justice, 2016
Keywords:
Campaigns, Communication & Marketing
Climate Surveys
Students & Student Activism
White House Task Force Recommendations
URL Link: https://www.justice.gov/ovw/protecting-students-sexual-assault
Brief Summary: The OVW Student Action Packet is designed to help students navigate the complexities of conducting a campus climate survey on sexual assault at their own college or university. The items in the student action packet provide students with resources to help them effectively engage with their college or university’s administration to conduct a campus climate survey on their own campus.
Main Points

The Student Action Packet includes:

  • FAQs developed in response to questions submitted by student advocates
  • Talking Points to help students understand and communicate about climate surveys
  • Administrators’ Perspective on Campus Climate Surveys — Two interviews with administrators
  • A Peer’s Perspective on Campus Climate Surveys — An interview with a student about campus climate surveys
  • CCSVS Fact Sheet on the Campus Climate Survey Validation Study

Title: Student Conduct Administration & Title IX: Gold Standard Practices for Resolution of Allegations of Sexual Misconduct on College Campuses
Type of Resource: White Paper
Source: Association for Student Conduct Administration (ASCA), 2014
Keywords:
Clery Act, Title IX, & Other Federal Guidance
Campus Safety & Policy
Response Strategies
URL Link: http://www.theasca.org/Files/Publications/ASCA%202014%20White%20Paper.pdf
Brief Summary: In this white paper, the ASCA shares their summary of “gold standard” practices for resolving Title IX cases through student conduct procedures. This report (a) identifies the guiding principles that should underlie all student conduct policies and procedures, as well as the recommended practices that are required for an institution to be a “gold standard” in responding to allegations of sexual misconduct, (b) outlines differences among various types of resolution methods, and (c) provides guiding questions for institutions to consider as they determine the most effective resolution method(s) for their unique campus environments.
Main Points

  • With different missions, resources, staffing models, funding sources, system policies, and especially campus cultures and student populations, each college or university must develop its own policies and procedures.
  • There are five stages of student conduct resolution procedures: policy, initial interactions, investigation, adjudication, and institutional response.
  • Within each of the five stages, there are recommended practices that can help an institution to address and resolve incidence of sexual violence effectively.

Title: Title IX: How it Affects Community Colleges and Students
Type of Resource: Blog Post
Source: The League for Innovation in the Community College, 2015
Keywords:
Campus Safety & Policy
Clery Act, Title IX, & Other Federal Guidance
Community Colleges
URL Link: https://www.league.org/innovation-showcase/title-ix-how-it-affects-community-colleges-and-students
Brief Summary: This blog post gives an overview of Title IX and discusses the strides North Lake Community College has made to implement a comprehensive program for faculty, staff, and students regarding Title IX guidelines.
Main Points

  • Ninety-five colleges and universities, including three community colleges, are currently under federal investigation over concerns about how they handle sexual assault cases on campus.
  • To adhere to Title IX guidelines, North Lake Community College in Irving, Texas has created a collaborative plan between faculty, staff and students to educate everyone about Title IX guidelines.
  • Their original program focuses on appropriate conduct, grievance procedures, and training modules, and can serve as a model which can be replicated at other community colleges.

Title: Tracing LGBTQ Community College Student’s Experiences
Type of Resource: Scholarly Journal Article
Source: New Directions for Community Colleges, 2016
Keywords:
Community Colleges
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Mental & Emotional Health
Non-Traditional Students
URL Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/cc.20202
Brief Summary:Most research on LGBTQ student communities are conducted within the traditional 4-year college programs. This article takes a closer look at the experiences of LGBTQ students within community colleges. Specifically, it focuses on these students’ coming-out experiences, support services, and allies on campus.
Main Points

  • Methods: The study was conducted via qualitative research approaches such as narrative research methods. Participants were gathered via emails sent out to organizations and identified LGBTQ centers/allies on community college campuses. 11 students and 7 faculty/staff allies were interviewed in person or by phone (representing 5 different community colleges).
  • Results: Students report attending community college for reasons unrelated to support or resources available to them. LGBTQ students say that the community college campus climate is ‘silent’, meaning that the community is supportive, but does not advocate on their behalf.
  • Conclusion: Intersectionality plays a huge role in self-identity, especially among the LGBTQ community. However, not all community colleges have been proactive or progressive in incorporating intersectionality concerns of the LGBTQ community within the campus.

Title: Training Student Leaders in Reporting Sexual Misconduct Incidents at a 2-year College
Type of Resource: Scholarly Journal Article
Source: Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 2016
Keywords:
Community Colleges
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Non-Traditional Students
Prevention Planning
Response Strategies
Students & Student Activism
URL Link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10668926.2016.1197866?journalCode=ucjc20
Brief Summary: This article explores the efficacy of training student leaders on how to report sexual misconduct incidents at a 2-year college.
Main Points

  • Methods: In 2013, Georgia Perimeter College (GPC), a 2-year college with an estimated student population of 21,057, implemented training protocols for student leaders regarding how to report incidents of sexual misconduct. Participants were 118 active members of the student government association and leaders in various clubs and organizations across five campuses at GPC. The training exercises lasted approximately two and a half hours.
  • Results: Results indicated the information on sexual misconduct and materials shared in a group-training format is a useful way to enhance knowledge, engagement, and beliefs relative to reporting sexual misconduct on campuses. Final percentages provided by the student leaders appear to indicate the training exercises were effective in leaving students confident to report sexual misconduct incidents on GPC campuses.
  • Conclusions: The training discussed in this study furthers the understanding of how to take a proactive approach in reporting incidents of sexual misconduct.

Title: Transforming Ohio Campuses: A Toolkit for Implementing the Changing Campus Culture
Type of Resource: Toolkit
Source: Ohio Alliance to End Sexual Violence, 2016
Keywords:
Campus Safety & Policy
Clery Act, Title IX, & Other Federal Guidance
Climate Surveys
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
URL Link: https://www.ohiohighered.org/sites/ohiohighered.org/files/uploads/ccc/Campu
sToolkit_300DPI.pdf
Brief Summary: This toolkit was designed as a starting point for campuses to help foster positive outcomes for survivors of sexual violence. It is designed for use by Title IX coordinators, campus leadership and other key responders to sexual violence. It can assist stakeholders in reviewing their current protocols against the knowledge gained from emerging best practices.
Main Points

This toolkit includes:

  • A Self-Assessment Tool
  • A Guide to Campus Protocol Development
  • Case Scenarios
  • A Campus Guide to Confidentiality
  • A Guide to Trauma-Informed Approaches
  • A Guide to Stakeholder Engagement
  • A Glossary
  • An Online Resource Guide

Title: Trauma and Psychological Distress Among Ethnically Diverse Community College Students
Type of Resource: Scholarly Journal Article
Source: Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 2016
Keywords:
Community Colleges
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Mental & Emotional Health
Non-Traditional Students
URL Link: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1090125
Brief Summary:
This study found high rates of past interpersonal trauma among a sample of community college students, which has been linked to psychological and physical distress and lower academic performance.
Main Points

  • Methods: A sample of community college students were surveyed to determine the impact of ethnicity on traumatic experiences and psychological distress. Findings showed that Black and Latino students reported higher levels of interpersonal trauma than White students.
  • Results: There was a positive association between trauma exposure and symptoms of depression, eating disorders, and PTSD. However, no ethnic differences were found in PTSD or depression scores among students exposed to interpersonal trauma.
  • Conclusions: The authors note that the high levels of exposure to domestic and community violence among this population is a concern, because the majority of community college students reside in the homes and neighborhoods where these events might have occurred. Additionally, students who are victims of interpersonal trauma may have difficulty attending classes due to competing demands such as court visits, doctors appointments, or relocating their household to a safer environment. The authors recommend community college faculty, staff, and students need to be made aware of the academic impacts of trauma, and community colleges need to provide more trauma-informed resources to their students on campus.

Title:Understanding and Responding to Campus Sexual Assault: A Guide to Climate Assessment for Colleges and Universities
Type of Resource: Toolkit
Source: Rutgers University, 2016
Keywords:
Climate Surveys
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Prevention Planning
Response Strategies
White House Task Force Recommendations
URL Link: https://socialwork.rutgers.edu/node/963
Brief Summary: The Center on Violence Against Women and Children at Rutgers University are piloting an evidence-informed method for assessing the climate regarding sexual assault on Rutgers’ New Brunswick campus during the 2014-2015. Throughout the campus climate assessment process, the researchers assembled this resource guide to share lessons they have learned. This resource guide provides direction informed by research evidence and best practices, as well as the experiences of the research team at Rutgers-New Brunswick.
Main Points

This resource guide consists of six chapters, each describing a different step in the campus climate assessment process:

  • Chapter One: Taking a Comprehensive Approach to Campus Climate Assessment
  • Chapter Two: Fostering Collaborations
  • Chapter Three: Conducting a Resource Audit
  • Chapter Four: Conducting a Student Survey
  • Chapter Five: Gathering Qualitative Data
  • Chapter Six: Action Planning and Dissemination

Evaluation: Through the piloting of the campus climate tool and development of a comprehensive campus climate assessment model, Rutgers received national attention for its efforts. After completing all data analysis, the VAWC research team drafted several reports outlining assessment findings.
For more information on evaluation: https://socialwork.rutgers.edu/node/962

Title: Vicarious Trauma Toolkit
Type of Resource: Toolkit
Source: Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), U.S. Department of Justice, 2016
Keywords:
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Mental & Emotional Health
Response Strategies
URL Link: https://vtt.ovc.ojp.gov/
Brief Summary: The Vicarious Trauma Toolkit (VTT) focuses on organizational responses to work-related exposure to trauma and is intended to provide organizations with the tools they need to fulfill their responsibility to support staff and become more vicarious trauma-informed.
Main Points

The VTT organizes resources for four disciplines: victim services, emergency medical services, fire services, and law enforcement.

The VTT can be used to:

  1. Conduct an assessment of your agency’s current capacity as a vicarious trauma-informed organizing using the Vicarious Trauma Organizational Readiness Guide
  2. Bring leadership and staff together to review your existing capacity, identify gaps and prioritize needs
  3. Locate resources and tools in the VTT and Compendium of Resources to help meet your identified needs
  4. Develop a comprehensive plan to become a vicarious trauma-informed organization that addresses exposure to single incidents of crime or violence and acts of mass violence and terrorism.

Evaluation: Literature and resource materials have been widely researched, compiled and vetted, and a rudimentary Toolkit was pilot-tested by the intended disciplines in seven communities with diverse demographics in all regions of the United States.
For more information on evaluation: http://www.northeastern.edu/iuhrp/projects/current/vicarious-trauma-toolkit-vtt/

Title: Where Do You Stand? Campaign Guide
Type of Resource: Toolkit
Source: Men Can Stop Rape, 2011
Keywords:
Bystander Intervention
Campaigns, Communications & Marketing
Evidence-Based Strategies & Research
Prevention Planning
URL Link: http://www.mencanstoprape.org/Handouts/where-do-you-stand-campaign-guide.html
Brief Summary: “Where Do You Stand?” is a comprehensive bystander intervention campaign for college men developed by the Men Can Stop Rape Organization.  The program focuses on engaging and mobilizing college aged men in the prevention of sexism and sexual assault.  This toolkit provides resources and materials to organize a campaign on college campuses, as well as past research and future evaluation methods on male bystander intervention.
Main Points

The “Where Do You Stand?” campaign engages and mobilizes college aged men using several techniques including positive messaging, identity-building, recommendations of performable actions, healthy masculinity, and messaging that identifies benefits to the individualThe toolkit includes:

  • Information on materials and bystander intervention training
  • Information on Campus Men of Strength Club
  • Planning a comprehensive campaign
  • Evaluating the success of campaign

Evaluation: Men Can Stop Rape’s 2009-2010 evaluation show that the MOST Club participants made statistically significant changes during the program year. After one year in a MOST Club, participants were more likely to:

  • Disagree with statements supporting the dominant story of masculinity and pro-harassment beliefs
  • Intervene in situations when a girl is being touched inappropriately by male peers
  • Intervene when a male peer was being verbally harassed or threatened with physical violence by another male peer

For more information on evaluation: https://www.mencanstoprape.org/Evaluation/